Category Archives: Nature

Abandoned

The above photos were taken near a storm management pond in Northwest Waterloo. The unnamed area is a small oasis of engineered nature tucked into the suburban landscape that cradles it.

As I walked the trail with my camera the signs of abandonment were evident. The milkweed seeds have long flown, mature enough to leave their summer womb behind. An empty nest that sheltered a new generation once hidden in the dense foliage now barren and exposed. The small white seed globes are all that remain where the flowers of a Canadian Horseweed plant once bloomed, its remaining leaves black and shrivelled from an early frost.

The chlorophyll-laden hues of summer and the fiery shades of early autumn have long since faded, replaced by muted tones and subdued colour as this place waits for the snowy white of winter’s grip. For now, there is still plenty of beauty to be found in that which has been left behind and abandoned.

Images were captured in November 2022, in Northwestern Waterloo, Ontario.

Photo Details (left to right):
1) Canon EOS 60D, EF70-200mm ƒ/2.8L IS II USM | 200mm, 1/400 sec. at ƒ/2.8, ISO100
2) Canon EOS 60D, EF70-200mm ƒ/2.8L IS II USM | 130mm, 1/60 sec. at ƒ/4.5, ISO100
3) Canon EOS 60D, EF70-200mm ƒ/2.8L IS II USM | 200mm, 1/13 sec. at ƒ/11, ISO100
Additional processing via Adobe Lightroom/Photoshop.


Credits and Additional Information

Milkweed Blizzard

This late blooming Milkweed, well maybe bloomer isn’t the right terminology as we are talking seeds and not flowers, is just releasing its payload now in November. In early fall the pods of this Monarch butterfly favorite split open to reveal silky tufted seeds. Most have already blown away on the autumn wind but as I walked along the edge of the Grand River I happened upon this stubborn plant just getting to it. I took the opportunity to capture some images of the mini blizzard spilling from the dried pods. When I was done my son helped the seeds on their journey by grabbing them in handfuls and throwing them up over his head and into the breeze.

Images were captured in November 2022, Claude Dubrick Trail along the Grand River, Waterloo, Ontario.

Photo Details (Clockwise from top left):
1) Canon EOS 60D, EF70-200mm ƒ/2.8L IS II USM | 200mm, 1/400 sec. at ƒ/3.2, ISO100
2) Canon EOS 60D, EF-S18-135mm ƒ/3.5-5.6 IS | 135mm, 1/250 sec. at ƒ/5.6, ISO200
3) Canon EOS 60D, EF-S18-135mm ƒ/3.5-5.6 IS | 135mm, 1/250 sec. at ƒ/5.6, ISO200
4) Canon EOS 60D, EF-S18-135mm ƒ/3.5-5.6 IS | 135mm, 1/250 sec. at ƒ/5.6, ISO200
Additional processing via Adobe Lightroom/Photoshop.


Credits and Additional Information

Divine Design

Divine Design

I’d arranged some free time to take a quiet hike along the Grand River. It was a beautiful day, overcast but bursting with shades of fall in the crisp afternoon air. I stepped from the trail to examine a fallen tree, gnarled and weathered shades of sun-bleached gray concealing a punch of colour nestled within. Red, orange and yellow waves of an inner light radiating outwards across a monochromatic backdrop. I ponder the moments when each broke free from captivity, falling on the autumn wind before congregating in this nook. A series of seemingly random acts so divinely orchestrated.

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Hibiscus Syriacus (Rose of Sharon)

With the unofficial middle of the Canadian summer just days away the blooms from three Rose of Sharon bushes that line the right boundary of my backyard are bursting to life with stunning colour and beauty. It is early days for the flowering plants that will continue to bloom and dazzle into the fall.

It is fascinating to watch as hundreds of tightly wound buds push their way through the green pods that have guarded and nurtured their beautiful secret since beginning to form in early spring. Now they fill the yard with the flowers of purple, pink, and creamy white pictured above.

Even the spent pods are beautiful in their own way. See the surviving remnants of last year’s pods at Greg’s Blog post, New and Old from spring of this year.

Images were captured in July 2022 in my backyard in Waterloo Region, Ontario.
Equipment: Canon EOS 60D, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM
Setting (Clockwise from top left): 1) 190mm, 1/8000 sec. at ƒ/2.8, ISO100 | 2) 200mm, 1/1250 sec. at ƒ/2.8, ISO100 | 3) 190mm, 1/8000 sec. at ƒ/2.8, ISO100 | 4) 182mm, 1/350 sec. at ƒ/8, ISO100 | 5) 110mm, 1/60 sec. at ƒ/8, ISO100
Additional processing via Adobe Lightroom/Photoshop.

Copyright 2022 Greg Glazebrook @ GMG Photography, All Rights Reserved.

As Local As It Gets

As Local As It Gets

With summer has come a lot more time outside and less spent on the computer blogging or organizing and editing my photo archive. I am certain as the seasons turn I will return to the screen again to find a treasure trove of great content posted by all of those I follow. Until then I will be in the garden, at the diamonds, fields, and swimming pools watching the kids, or riding my bike around town and along the riverside trails. I will drop the occasional post when the mood strikes (like today) and both my photo series Backyard Beautiful and Queens of the Diamond will continue to update.

When you live in the Great White North summer is fleeting and the growing season too short to maintain a year-round garden. Most of the fresh food we consume comes from far-off places like California, Mexico, and South America. Of course, the war in Russia and government pandemic spending practices have sent fuel prices sky high and driven inflation upwards at a pace not seen in decades. The cost of food has not been immune to these upward pressures and is becoming unaffordable for many around the world.

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Yellow Flowers

It seems the colour of choice in the garden right now is yellow. From the day lily to the blooming vegetable plants the garden is yellow everywhere. The blooms images from top left are Butternut Squash, Daylily (which are not true lilies), Zucchini flower, and finally a true Lily from the genus Lilium.

Images were captured in June 2022 in my backyard in Waterloo Region, Ontario.
Equipment: Canon EOS 60D, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM
Additional processing via Adobe Lightroom/Photoshop.

Copyright 2022 Greg Glazebrook @ GMG Photography, All Rights Reserved.

End of the Roll

Back in the day, Bushboy’s Last on the Card challenge may have been called Last on the Roll. Film cameras and the silver halide strips we put in them are pretty much relics from a bygone era. I have a huge collection of both negative and positive (aka slide) film packed away along with two Minolta and one Pentax cameras. The task of converting the volume of film into digital files will be monumental should I ever get around to it.

Today we take pictures from our phones, by the hundreds. All of today’s camera systems take images using a charge-coupled device (CCD). Believe it or not, this terrific device led to Eastman-Kodak’s Steve Sasson inventing the first digital camera in the early 1970s. The images were stored on magnetic cassette and would be available to view on any television screen. When he presented the technology to the company they were less than impressed. Sasson discussed management’s reaction to the invention in a New York Times interview years later:

“They were convinced that no one would ever want to look at their pictures on a television set. Print had been with us for over 100 years, no one was complaining about prints, they were very inexpensive, and so why would anyone want to look at their picture on a television set?”

Kodak was the dominant U.S. photography brand and they didn’t want to cannibalize their own film business. A shortsighted decision that prevented them from filing patents and when they did make the switch to digital eighteen years later it was too little, too late.

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House Sparrow

The pond in the backyard attracts all kinds of birds. While the ducks (click here to see them featured in a previous post) prefer to sunbathe around the edges of the pond, the waterfall is where it’s at for the smaller winged visitors. The images highlighted in today’s Backyard Beautiful post feature a house sparrow that loves to flap around in the cup-sized hole in a stone sitting at the base of the waterfall and acts as a birdbath for our feathered friends.

Images were captured in June 2022 in my backyard in Waterloo Region, Ontario.
Equipment: Canon EOS 60D, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM
Additional processing via Adobe Lightroom/Photoshop.

Copyright 2022 Greg Glazebrook @ GMG Photography, All Rights Reserved.

A Fantastic Fungus Among Us

I found this giant fungus growing out of a tree stump in a picnic area alongside the Gilkison Trail which follows the Grand River in Brantford, Ontario. The location is across the road from the Steve Brown Sports Complex at Lions Park. The facility hosts youth sports tournaments all summer long making it surprising that the specimen was relatively untouched despite the heavy foot traffic that would pass it when using the picnic pavilion. My luck because it was a fabulous photo opportunity.

Images were captured in May 2022 near the Grand River, Brantford, Ontario.
Equipment: Canon EOS 60D, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM.
Additional processing via Adobe Lightroom/Photoshop.

Copyright 2022 Greg Glazebrook @ GMG Photography, All Rights Reserved.